20pluscommunitydigestion

There is a great difference in excellency, usefulness, and comfort between people of clear, digested knowledge, and confused, undigested apprehensions. -Richard Baxter

Archive for christianity

what can “knowing that you know” free you to do?

Die without fear.  Gayle Williams was 34.

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David Foster Wallace: words of life from a man dead too soon

Several of you asked for the article in full to which I referred this morning from David Foster Wallace.

Here you are, from the Wall Street Journal of Sept 19 of this year.

A member of our church (and our neighbor here in the Cliff!) passed the article  along to me.  In addition to Wallace’s winsome prose, his insight into the human condition is remarkable.  He seemed to understand so much, and yet seemed to disallow the possibility that the very means by which we are liberated from the idolatries to which we are so prone does not exist in us naturally.

Consumers vs. disciples: a more adversarial relationship than perhaps we thought

Jim Dennison is the pastor of Park Cities Baptist Church and writes a daily devotional entitled Godissues.org. Click there to subscribe.

This morning he speaks, I think, most aptly to our condition:

Consumers don’t make good disciples

Yesterday we began thinking about the folly of fighting your Goliath in your strength. As we saw, Alan Wolfe’s The Transformation of American Religion warns that many of us are consumers more than we are disciples, self-reliant rather than God-sufficient Read the rest of this entry »

new thread on an old subject: the baptism of babies

You’re a member (or at least a visitor) of a Reformed Church, a designation having an historical dimension (The Reformation of the 16th century) as it relates to its theological dimension (salvation is by faith alone).  In this Reformed church you see the monthly practice of baptism, and usually the baptism of infants.  That is what you find here.

But as one located in the “buckle” of the Bible Belt, you find yourself surrounded primarily by churches of a Baptistic nature.  If in a baptistic church, then baptism is reserved for those who can make a personal profession of faith; it is therefore not to be extended to infants or children who cannot enunciate their profession of faith because they do not know that profession. Read the rest of this entry »

state of the economy for dummies

the flood of commentary on the state of the American economy in recent weeks can lead one to believe thatwe’re talking about another Enron-kind-of-complicated matter here. The folks at Between Two Worlds have done us the favor of pointing us to a brief on this labyrinthine issue.

To understand the financial matters afoot is not merely a matter for economists or pundits. What’s happening in the highest echelons of commerce and government is an issue worth the consideration of Christians, too. Read the rest of this entry »

More vérité about cinema

If Sir Heffner has gotten you thinking about what film requires of you, here’s some more wisdom that will serve you: a book review of Tony Watkins’ Focus: The Art of Soul and Cinema.

Before you plunk down another $10-spot on a film at NorthPark, you might plunk down $15 (or less if you use addall.com) on his book.

Marriage question 1:

as we promised a couple weeks ago, we’d like to post every few days one of the questions we didn’t have time for during our panel discussion on Aug 28th with married folks from within our community.  

 

WIthout further ado, question 1: “what is the ONE piece of advice you have for singles wanting to get married?”